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Catana technology

The drawing office at the Catana shipyard aims to improve performance on an ongoing basis. The shipyard has developed an incredible number of innovations over the last 26 years.

If we look at some of the most significant of these, the infusion construction procedure is particularly important insofar as it greatly optimises boat weight. The Twaron Impact process significantly improves the rigidity and stability of the hulls, whilst the invention of the legendary daggerboards has enabled Catana to create the first catamarans that perform well when facing the wind.

In recent years, the development of carbon fibre has also increased the speed of Catana catamarans: the fastest sailing boats in the world that can be sailed by non-professional sailors. Whilst we focus systematically on performance, our research is always accompanied by extremely high standards of comfort and safety.

Infusion:

This replaces the earlier technique of applying resin with a roller. The Seemann Composite Resin Infusion Molding Process (SCRIMP) optimises weight considerably and ensures the right amount of resin is applied evenly over the layers of fibre. This innovation reduces the amount of harmful fumes emitted during construction whilst at the same time increasing the solidity, lightness and performance of your catamaran.

Almost all of the constituent parts of the Catana can be built using the infusion technique, including the hull, nacelle, roof, partitions and other sections.

The entirety of the hull/deck of the Catana is an exceptionally rigid monoblock structure that maintains its shape without distortion.

Carbon-fibre:

The Catana shipyard’s drawing office aims to optimise the weight of its boats on a continual basis.

The structure and composition of carbon fibre is much more rigid than fibreglass. Using this material makes it possible to halve the number of layers of material in certain sections and so makes the boat a great deal lighter.

A study conducted by the Catana shipyard has discovered how to make our boats as light as is currently possible.

As a result the roof, main partitions, floor plates, omega rails, hull reinforcements and structural supports of a Catana are all made of carbon fibre. In the latest Catana 47, for example, we have managed to lose 700 kilos!

The Catana shipyard is one of the few recreational boat shipyards in the world to construct its entire range using carbon fibre.

Twaron Impact:

Twaron is a material known for its rigidity, lightness and resistance due to state-of-the-art aramid fibre. It is often used to make bullet-proof vests. One special characteristic of Twaron is that it is ten times more resistant than traditional fibreglass.

The hull of your Catana is reinforced with Twaron, thus improving its shock absorption.

The Twaron Impact process uses vinylester resins that have the same mechanical properties as epoxy resin, without the inconvenience in use or of subsequent repairs.

The unsinkable nature of the boat and the extremely tough Twaron Impact structures ensure that Catana catamarans can sail in very difficult conditions in complete safety.

Sandwich structure:

Every element of a Catana (hull, deck, roof and partitions) is built using a vacuum sandwich construction. This structure involves wedging a layer of foam between two layers of material. This process gives the boat a lightness and lifespan that are quite extraordinary.

The core of the hull is made from PVC foam at least 20mm thick; this is reinforced with fibreglass as well as a layer of Twaron on the lower section of the hull.

The core of the partitions and the roof is made from foam up to 40mm thick and is reinforced with carbon fibre.

The sandwich-style architecture and extensive use of foam play an important role in ensuring that Catana catamarans are unsinkable.

 

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